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What is space debris and its cause?

Over the past 70 years, many space explorations took place, so that research could be conducted in areas such as astronomy, astrophysics, planetary science and geology, atmospheric science, and theoretical physics.

In this article, we have described what is space debris, how they are constructed and what are the tools to track and measure them.

What-is-space-debris-and-its-cause
What are space debris and its cause?

Space travel or space exploration is the discovery of the universe and its discovery using the techniques of space. Space is physically discovered by manned space flights and robotic spacecraft.

Over the past 70 years, many space explorations took place, so that research could be conducted in areas such as astronomy, astrophysics, planetary science and geology, atmospheric science, and theoretical physics.

What is space debris?

Debris refers to something that has been destroyed or broken. When it comes to space debris, it refers to the natural debris found in the celestial bodies of the solar system such as asteroids, comets, and meteorites (a small rocky or metallic body in outer space).

But in today’s context, space debris also has fragmented and old satellites and rocket remains because these remains also rotate in Earth’s orbit due to the force of gravity and collide with each other and produce debris. Huh. Their number in space is increasing day by day.

 

What causes debris in space

What causes debris in space?

Space debris includes not only fragments of asteroids, comets, and meteorites, but also fragments of old satellites, rocket fuel, paint flakes, frozen liquid refrigerants.

In other words, these are man-made debris orbiting the Earth in space and are no longer useful.

 

According to the United States Space Monitoring Network, 23,000 larger than 10 centimeters (or the equivalent of four inches), 500,000 larger than one centimeter, and 100,00,000 space debris larger than one millimeter are scattered in space.

In fact, more than 1800 man-made satellites are orbiting our Earth. After finishing their work, not all of them are returning to Earth. Even after breaking contact with the space stations on Earth, they will revolve around the Earth and collide with each other and split into small pieces.

How is space debris dangerous for operational satellites as well as Earth’s atmosphere?

Debris in space has a very high kinetic energy and speeds of about 8 km per second, which can cause massive damage to satellites and large pieces of several centimeters can shake an entire space station or shuttlecraft. Most of the debris is found in a geological orbit above the equator.
What-is space-debris-dangerous

The threat of a collision came into existence when an operational satellite and a piece of space debris collided with the upper stage of a European Ariane rocket on Serie’s (French microsatellite) on 24 July 1996. The collision partially damaged the chain but is still functional.

The real danger came when Iridium 33 (a communications satellite owned by the American company Motorola) collided with the Cosmos 2251, completely destroying the operational satellite.

In addition to the threat of operational satellites, it is also a threat to the Earth’s atmosphere. Since most debris is found in geostationary orbit above the equator, if this debris comes into contact with the Earth’s atmosphere and it burns the Earth’s surface, we can estimate the loss of life and property. Cannot be applied

Equipment for tracking and measuring space debris

  • A device called LIDAR (a combination of radar and optical detector) has been created to track space debris.
  • Recently, the NASA Orbital Debris Observatory has built a device called the Liquid Mirror Transit Telescope that can detect space debris up to 3 meters (10 ft) in size.
  • More recently, it has been discovered that debris in space can also be detected with the help of FM radio waves.

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